Shadow Quilts Class Plan

by Patricia Maixner Magaret & Donna Ingram Slusser

NOTES TO INSTRUCTORS & SHOP OWNERS
Shadow Quilts is a design technique. It begins with a basic block and repeats the image in small and large scale to create a multi-layered effect. It appeals to confident beginners who want to stretch their design wings. More experienced designers will want to add this technique to their repertoire to generate additional original ideas.

Consider scheduling several classes:
For those who want to explore the actual designing aspect of this technique.
For those who want to explore the designing aspect of this technique and begin their own project in class.
For quilters who all make one specific project.
For creating mock-ups.

To promote classes, try a combination of these ideas:
Display the book, Shadow Quilts, prominently with an announcement of classes.
Display the Shadow Quilt Sample Quilt Brochures with suggested fabrics, or use some fantastic color combinations of your own.
Make samples of several designs. Suggestions: "Shoo Fly Don't Bother Me" in the Sample Quilt Brochure; one of other projects from the book; interpret one of the illustrations in fabric.
Make fabric kits to go with the Sample Quilt Brochure.
Make several mock-ups (pages 57-61). Frame and display!

MATERIALS FOR SHOP TO STOCK
Shadow Quilts by Patricia Maixner Magaret & Donna Ingram Slusser
graph paper (4 or 8 squares per inch)
mock-ups class will also need Steam-A-Seam 2® (double-sided fusible webbing is essential)

GENERAL GUIDELINES
The Shadow Quilts book is divided into 5 sections. Directions are clear and easy to understand with many illustrations and photos of quilts to use as examples.

The basics and the technique
Fabric selection - the importance of value and fabric design elements
Create many variations from a single design
How to make a mock-up
You can design projects using graph paper or with a computer and software programs

IDEAS FOR CLASSES
Class #1 Design only during class.
Class #2 Design during class and bring fabrics to start a project.
Class #3 Make a single project, for example, the "Shoo Fly Don't Bother Me" Shadow Quilt.
Class #4 Make a Shadow Quilt Mock-Up.

Because we travel and teach, our most popular class is a combination of Class #1, #2, and #3. Students come prepared to learn the design technique. Some design all day, others start to work on their project in fabric, while others begin work on a mock-up. Our class description is a combination of all three descriptions.

Each class walks the students through the basic design process, pages 9-23, and the importance of contrast and value, pages 25-28.

Remember that students learn this technique at different rates. Some will grasp the concept immediately while others will need more encouragement and individual help. Encourage the students to work at their own pace, particularly during the design process.

We have exchanged our graph paper designs for computer generated projects. See pages 63-67. We encourage students to bring their laptop computers and portable printers to use during class, and we usually bring ours as well. At the beginning of the class, we try to put those not familiar with computers at ease. We state this is a new way of doing things and perhaps later in the day they can watch one of us demonstrate how to design a simple Shadow Quilt, or they can observe a neighbor creating a design.

CLASSROOM SET-UP
Each student will need table space approx. 36" x 30" -- usually two students/table for all classes. Irons and ironing boards are needed for the sewing and mock-up classes. Electrical outlets for computers.

FOLLOW-UP
Schedule a reunion day 5-6 months down the road and announce it during classes. Exhibit projects.

CLASS #1
Design a Shadow Quilt -- Learn the Shadow Quilts design technique. Start with a basic block and repeat it in various sizes to create a multi-layered Shadow effect. Skill level: Confident Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced. One 3-4 hour session.

SUPPLY LIST
Shadow Quilts by Patricia Maixner Magaret & Donna Ingram Slusser
General Drafting Supplies:
10 Sheets of graph paper (8-1/2" X 11", 4 or 8 squares per inch)
4-5 larger sheets of graph paper, approx. 18" x 18", 4 or 8 squares per inch (can be smaller sheets taped together to make larger sheets)
tracing paper, 4-5 sheets (8-1/2" x 11")
pencil and eraser for pattern drafting and for notes
scissors for cutting paper
clear rulers: 1" x 6" (or 1" x 12") and 6" x 12"
colored pencils -- including three strong colors, very different colors, such as red, blue and green
pencil sharpener
optional: books with simple block designs such as "Quilter's Album of Blocks and Borders" by J. Beyer or "It's OK if You Sit on My Quilt" by M.E. Hopkins.
optional: laptop computer with a quilting design program or drawing program, and portable printer if you have one.

LESSON PLANS
1. Show samples of Shadow Quilts and/or mock-ups. Point out terms and definitions, pages 10-15.
2. Present criteria for selecting the basic block, pages 17-19.
3. Have each student design a simple Shadow Quilt using the Shoo Fly block, pages 20-22. Present the material step-by-step. Have students do each step with you as you go through them.
4. Present material and show examples of variations on a basic design, pages 39-55.
5. Let students work on designing their own Shadow Quilts. They can use traditional blocks, or design their own simple original block. To facilitate exploring changes, use tracing paper to place over the original design to create variations without having to re-draw the original design. Have frequent show & tell of the designs as they are created. Give lots of encouragement.
6. Discuss and show examples of the importance of contrast and value, and other factors when selecting fabrics, pages 27-37.

CLASS #2
Design a Shadow Quilt and Start a Project in Class -- Learn the Shadow Quilts design technique. Start with a basic block and repeat it in various sizes to create a multi-layered Shadow effect. Bring fabrics to start your original design. Skill level: Confident Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced. One 6 hour session.

SUPPLY LIST
Shadow Quilts by Patricia Maixner Magaret & Donna Ingram Slusser
sewing machine and general sewing supplies (scissors, pins, thread, etc.)
rotary cutter, mat and ruler(s)
vertical design wall (such as flannel), approx. 36" x 45"
optional: template material if you want to use templates (or pre-cut template sets if you already have them)

General Drafting Supplies:
10 Sheets of graph paper (8-1/2" X 11", 4 or 8 squares per inch)
4-5 larger sheets of graph paper, approx. 18" x 18", 4 or 8 squares per inch (can be smaller sheets taped together to make larger sheets)
tracing paper, 4-5 sheets (8-1/2" x 11")
pencil and eraser for pattern drafting and for notes
scissors for cutting paper
clear rulers: 1" x 6" (or 1" x 12") and 6" x 12"
colored pencils -- including three strong colors, very different colors, such as red, blue and green
pencil sharpener
optional: books with simple block designs such as "Quilter's Album of Blocks and Borders" by J. Beyer or "It's OK if You Sit on My Quilt" by M.E. Hopkins.
optional: laptop computer with a quilting design program or drawing program, and portable printer if you have one.
Fabric for medium-size wall quilt: Read about the importance of value and contrast, and fabric selection, pages 25-37. Select fabrics that have good contrast between the three design elements: the background, the individual blocks and the shadow. You can choose one fabric for each of the design elements (background, shadow and individual blocks). Or you can use several fabrics for one element, but these must be similar in color and value. For example, you could use 4-5 lights that are almost the same for the background.

SUGGESTED COLOR SCHEME OPTIONS

  Background Shadow Indiv. Blocks
Color Scheme A Light Dark Medium
Color Scheme B Dark Light Medium

FABRIC AMOUNTS
Background ___ yd; Shadow ___ yd; Individual Blocks ___ yd; Borders -- 12" x 30" (approx)

LESSON PLANS
1. Show samples of Shadow Quilts or mock-ups. Point out terms and definitions, pages 10-15.
2. Present criteria for selecting the basic block, pages 17-19.
3. Have each student design a simple Shadow Quilt using the Shoo Fly block, pages 20-23. Present the material step-by-step and have students do each step as you go.
4. Present material and show examples of variations on a basic design, pages 39-55.
5. Discuss and show examples of the importance of contrast and value, and other factors when selecting fabrics, pages 27-37.
6. Let students work on designing their own Shadow Quilts. They can use traditional blocks, or design their own simple original block to use. Some students prefer to design all day, while others will want start cutting out their project as soon as they create a design they like. Some students cut pieces and place them on their design wall first, and wait until they get back home to sew. Others prefer to start sewing early in the process. We suggest that students do not set up their sewing machine until they are ready to use it.
7. Have lots of Show & Tell, both in the design process and during the work-on-projects time.

CLASS #3
Make the ____________ Shadow Quilt -- Learn the Shadow Quilts design technique and bring your own fabrics to make this fabulous design! Skill level: Confident Beginner, Intermediate. One 6 hour session.

SUPPLY LIST
Shadow Quilts by Patricia Maixner Magaret & Donna Ingram Slusser
2 sheets of graph paper (8-1/2" X 11", 4 or 8 squares per inch)
pencil and eraser for pattern drafting and for notes
clear rulers: 1" x 6" (or 1" x 12")
colored Pencils -- three strong colors, very different colors, such as red, blue and green
sewing machine
general sewing supplies (scissors, pins, thread, etc)
rotary cutter, mat and ruler(s)
vertical design wall (such as flannel), approx. 36" x 45"
Fabrics: [use guidelines in the book for the project you are using]

INSTRUCTOR NOTES
Use any one of the 9 projects in the book, preferably one of the simpler ones. Make a sample to display to entice people to take the class. Insert the name of the project, the fabric requirements and fabric amounts onto the student supply list above. Prepare any templates that are needed and be ready to demonstrate how to make half-square and quarter-square triangles or other techniques if needed.

LESSON PLANS
1. Show sample of the Shadow Quilt to be made. Point out terms and definitions, pages 10-15.
2. Present criteria for selecting the basic block used in this design, pages 17-19.
3. Design the Shadow Quilt used for the project, using pages 20-22 as a guide. Present the material step-by-step and have the students do each step as you go.
4. Give a brief presentation on the importance of contrast, value, and other information presented on pages 25-37. Have students show their fabrics to check for good contrast between the background, the individual blocks, and the shadow.
5. Present the project. Demonstrate needed techniques (half-square triangles, for example).
6. Students work on the project. Place completed blocks on the design wall for as-you-go show & tell.
7. Optional: Present material on pages 25-37 in more detail as well as the information on pages 39-55 for future designing possibilities.

CLASS #4
Make A Shadow Quilt Mock-Up -- Learn the Shadow Quilts design technique. Start with a basic block and repeat it in various sizes to create a multi-layered Shadow effect. Then start a mock-up to frame and hang on your wall to grace your decor. Skill level: Confident Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced. One 6 hour session.

SUPPLY LIST
Shadow Quilts by Patricia Maixner Magaret & Donna Ingram Slusser
General Drafting Supplies:
10 Sheets of graph paper (8-1/2" X 11", 4 or 8 squares per inch)
4-5 larger sheets of graph paper, approx. 18" x 18", 4 or 8 squares per inch (can be smaller sheets taped together to make larger sheets)
tracing paper, 4-5 sheets (8-1/2" x 11")
pencil and eraser for pattern drafting and for notes
scissors for cutting paper
clear rulers: 1" x 6" (or 1" x 12") and 6" x 12"
colored pencils -- including three strong colors, very different colors, such as red, blue and green
pencil sharpener
optional: books with simple block designs such as "Quilter's Album of Blocks and Borders" by J. Beyer or "It's OK if You Sit on My Quilt" by M.E. Hopkins.
optional: laptop computer with a quilting design program or drawing program, and portable printer if you have one.

MOCK-UP SUPPLIES
heavy poster board or foam core board, approx. 24" x 24"
Steam-A-Seam 2, approx. 12" x 36" or equivalent
rotary cutter and mat -- you will be cutting through fabric with Steam-A-Seam on the back side. If your rotary cutter has a dull blade, it is OK.
ruler 6" x 24"
optional: your own iron and pressing board/mat
Fabrics: Read about the importance of value and contrast, and fabric selection, pages 25-37. Select fabrics that have enough contrast between the three design elements: the background, the individual blocks and the shadow. You can choose one fabric for each of the design elements (background, shadow and individual blocks). Or you can use several fabrics for one element, but these must be similar in color and value. For example, you could use 4-5 lights that are almost the same for the background.

SUGGESTED COLOR SCHEME OPTIONS

  Background Shadow Indiv. Blocks
Color Scheme A Light Dark Medium
Color Scheme B Dark Light Medium

FABRIC AMOUNTS
Background ___ yd; Shadow ___ yd; Individual Blocks ___ yd; Borders -- 12" x 30" (approx)

INSTRUCTOR NOTES
Read pages 57-61 and make sample mock-ups. Be prepared to demonstrate how to use Steam-A-Seam 2® (how to apply it to the back side; and how to reposition pieces on the board when you change your mind about the color scheme or want to try a "what if"). Extra supplies to bring to class: extra rotary cutter with dull blade and Exacto® knife for cutting foam core board (if students use this instead of heavy poster board).

LESSON PLANS
1. Show samples of Shadow Quilts and mock-ups. Point out terms and definitions, pages 10-15.
2. Present criteria for selecting the basic block, pages 17-19.
3. Have each student design a simple Shadow Quilt using the Shoo Fly block, pages 20-22. Present the material step-by-step and have students do each step as you go.
4. Present material and show examples of variations on a basic design, pages 39-55.
5. Give a presentation on the importance of contrast, value, and other information presented on pages 25-37. Have students show their fabrics to check for good contrast between the background, the individual blocks, and the shadow.
6. Let students work on designing their own Shadow Quilts. When they have a design they like, they can start to make the mock-up.
7. Present information on how to make a mock-up, pages 58-61. Demonstrate as needed.

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